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Cold front moving in; bitter wind expected

January 17, 2013
The Daily News

By LISA M. REED

Staff Writer

IRON MOUNTAIN - Colder air from Canada is moving into the Upper Peninsula and northeastern Wisconsin in the next week and will bring below zero temperatures and wind chills.

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With the lack of snow on the ground, weather officials remind everyone to take the necessary precautions and make sure heaters are functioning properly and pipes do not freeze.

Todd Kluber, meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Marquette, said colder air is coming to Dickinson and Iron counties in the next week.

"A front passed Wednesday, which brought a dusting of snow to the area," he said.

A high of 10 degrees is expected today and Friday.

But Friday night's low will be six degrees below zero.

Kluber said the wind chills will be 20 degrees below zero Friday night.

He added winds will be around 10 mph, but "it doesn't take a lot of wind to bring below zero windchills."

Temperatures on Friday and Saturday will be in the mid 20s.

"The next round of cold air will be on Saturday and Saturday night. We're looking at lows of five degrees above zero and a high around 10 degrees on Sunday with a low of five degrees below zero on Sunday night," Kluber said.

Then wind chills could drop, and the coldest air could be on Monday night with 25 degrees below zero predicted.

Monday's high temperature will be seven degrees above zero.

Tuesday's high temperature will be five degrees above zero, and Wednesday's high temperature will be 12 degrees above zero.

Kluber said a low pressure system sitting in Ontario and Hudson Bay, Canada is causing counterclockwise winds to pull cold air to the north.

Those who venture out in the cold temperatures are advised to dress warm.

Warm temperatures last week melted snow exposing the ground.

Kluber said with the lack of snow cover, it will be cold and water pipes could break.

"Keep pipes dripping by running water," he said.

Although below zero temperatures with wind chills is normal for January in the U.P., this year has been a warmer than normal winter.

At this time last year, Kluber said temperatures were 12 degrees below zero.

"Outside of that, the last couple winters and so far this year, there has not been extreme cold weather," he said.

With the cold temperatures, there will be no significant snow accumulation.

Weather officials said light snow could accumulate about an inch of snow by the end of the weekend.

Lisa M. Reed's e-mail address is lreed@ironmountaindailynews.com.

 
 

 

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