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A new privileged class

October 1, 2013 - Blaine Hyska
“If you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan.” — President Barack Obama, Aug. 11, 2009 Oops. My bad. That depends, CNN News says: “...only a handful of existing individual plans that people currently have will be grandfathered into the exchanges. So, most people who are currently in the individual market will need to get new plans.”

“You can keep your own doctor.” —President Barack Obama, July 16, 2009 Did I say that? I should have read the bill. Not necessarily true, CNN News says: “It is probably true that the majority of people who have insurance will not be affected by the new law. But, clearly some will.” "Depending on the plan you choose in the marketplace, you may be able to keep your current doctor," a Health and Human Services official told CNN, adding, "Different plans have different networks and providers...if staying with your current doctors is important to you, check to see if they are included before choosing a plan."

The Rasmussen Reports independent public opinion survey shows 50 percent oppose Health Care Law’s Individual Mandate, while 36 percent favor it. So much for the U.S. House speaking for a “narrow ideological agenda.” Additionally, 51 percent of those surveyed were willing to risk a government shutdown until Democrats and Republicans agree on what spending for the health care law to cut.

And why did Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid emphatically reject an amendment that would have forced the Washington elite —including the president, vice president, Cabinet members and members of Congress — to start buying their insurance through the state exchanges like everyone else?

The president declared this an “historic day.”

Was he really talking about the beginning of a new privileged class in Washington?

 
 

 

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